Tag Archives: Monsanto

USA Approves Bayer-Monsanto Mega-Merger Canada could be next

April 10, 2018. On Monday April 9, the Wall Street Journal reported that the United States Department of Justice has agreed to allow a merger between seed and pesticide companies Bayer and Monsanto, creating the largest seed and pesticide company in the world. A US approval means that Canada could also soon permit the merger.

The US Department of Justice has not yet officially announced the deal, along with any conditions for the approval. Europe allowed the merger on the condition that Bayer sell some of its seeds, pesticides and digital farming investments to remove overlaps with Monsanto.

A decision from Canada’s Competition Bureau is also required but no timeline has been provided. The proposed merger requires regulatory approval from anti-trust agencies across the world.

“A US decision brings a Canadian announcement closer,” said Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN). “Canada is on the verge of making a decision that will affect farmers and consumers for many decades. It will shape the future of food and farming in Canada and across the world.”

The new merged company could control around 30 percent of the world’s commercial seed market and 25 percent of agricultural pesticides.

“A merger of this size creates an unprecedented level of corporate control over seeds and pesticides,” said Sharratt.

CBAN is calling on The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to stop the merger.

SOURCE

 

Republicans Back Monsanto, Threaten to Cut WHO’s Funding Which Calls Glysophate ‘Carcinogenic’

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

Some Republican lawmakers have bashed the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, a World Health Organization, WHO, agency and threatened to cut its funding over for calling a widely used herbicide chemical, glyphosate as a possible “carcinogenic” at a House Science Committee hearing.

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

On Tuesday, a Republican representative from Texas, Lamar Smith, said the health regulating agency’s claims were “unsubstantiated” and “not backed by reliable data.”

“The selective use of data and the lack of public disclosure raise questions about why IARC should receive any government funding in the future,” Smith said.

WHO is defending its stance based on years-long research.

SOURCE

The Stomach-churning Violence of Monsanto, Bayer and the Agrochemical Oligopoly

By Colin Todhunter – Aug 29, 2017:  As humans, we have evolved with the natural environment over millennia. We have learned what to eat and what not to eat, what to grow and how to grow it and our diets have developed accordingly. We have hunted, gathered, planted and harvested. Our overall survival as a species has been based on gradual, emerging relationships with the seasons, insects, soil, animals, trees and seeds. And out of these relationships, we have seen the development of communities whose rituals and bonds have a deep connection with food production and the natural environment.

However, over the last couple generations, agriculture and food production has changed more than it had done over previous millennia. These changes have involved massive social upheaval as communities and traditions have been uprooted and have entailed modifying what we eat, how we grow our food and what we apply to it. All of this has been driven by geopolitical concerns and powerful commercial interests with their proprietary chemicals and patented seeds. The process of neoliberal globalisation is accelerating the process as farmers are encouraged to produce for global supply chains dominated by transnational agribusiness.

Certain crops are now genetically engineered, the range of crops we grow has become less diverse, synthetic biocides have been poured on crops and soil and our bodies have been subjected to a chemical bombardment. We have arrived at a point where we have lost touch with our deep-rooted microbiological and social connection with nature and have developed an arrogance that has placed ‘man’ above the environment and all other species. One of the consequences is that we have paid an enormous price in terms of the consequent social, environmental and health-related devastation.

Source: RINF

 

In memoriam: Shiv Chopra, former Health Canada scientist and whistleblower

Chopra was a hero of the non-GMO movement, best remembered for leading the resistance to  government and industry pressure including agro-chemical giant Monsanto to approve bovine growth hormone in Canada.

by January 14, 2018

Growing up in India during the Second World War, Shiv Chopra was shaped by two of Mahatma Gandhi’s guiding principles: “Civil disobedience becomes a sacred duty when the state becomes lawless or corrupt,” and “the first step in fighting injustice is to make it visible.”

On January 7, the former Health Canada scientist and whistle-blower who believed “we should take food out of the economic equation” quietly succumbed to cancer in a Kanata hospice, surrounded by family. He was 84. A memorial for family and friends will be held January 20 in Ottawa. A public memorial will be held in February.

Online tributes continue to pour in from all over the world in response to the loss of Chopra’s courageous voice from the front lines of food safety activism.

A microbiologist and drug safety regulator with the Bureau of Veterinary Drugs for 35 years, Chopra is best remembered for leading the resistance to U.S. government and industry pressure including from agro-chemical giant Monsanto to approve bovine growth hormone (rBGH) and other veterinary drugs of questionable human safety. Monsanto insisted on Health Canada’s approval after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rubber-stamped the drugs for licensing.

But Chopra and fellow scientists Margaret Haydon and Gérard Lambert refused, pointing to gaps in Monsanto’s safety data. The in-house controversy hit the fan at Senate hearings at the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Forestry in 1998, where Chopra delivered unflinching – many say heroic – testimony that blew the lid off government and industry complicity in Health Canada’s drug approval process. His insistence on “my duty to speak out” made Chopra a darling of the non-GMO movement, but he refused to wear the hero’s mantle.

“Canadians owe Shiv Chopra a great deal,” Council of Canadians chair Maude Barlow said in a recent Ottawa Citizen interview.

But despite parliamentary assurances to the contrary, Chopra and his colleagues would be subjected to severe reprisals from their Health Canada bosses for going public, and would ultimately get fired for insubordination, receiving their notices in the mail on the same day in 2004.

Ian Bron, a researcher with Canadians for Accountability, says Chopra “had an ethical code that disregarded the (senior) status of others and he needed to be made an example of. Textbook stuff.”

Chopra was a model scientist who came up against systemic racism and government misconduct almost the moment he entered the civil service in 1968, filing two landmark human rights complaints alleging discrimination in the public service in 1992 and 1993, before transforming himself over the years into an anti-corruption warrior inside the health services branch.

The Senate hearings produced a list of recommendations around Health Canada’s drug approval process. But none were ever implemented, according to Chopra, who in 2014 founded the Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health to carry on his work of food safety advocacy and education.

After years of grievances and appeals, an adjudicator ordered the reinstatement of Lambert and Haydon but not Chopra. But his son Anil says that his father wasn’t really fighting to get his job back.

“The case didn’t really matter to him. I think that’s lost on a lot of people. We would say to him that he had already won,” says Anil. “You can’t undo that kind of movement, that kind of legacy. That’s what kept him going. He wanted to make sure Canada was a better place after he left.”

Source: https://nowtoronto.com/news/in-memoriam-shiv-chopra/

Tributes have been pouring in from all over the world – Friends and supporters: instead of sending flowers Dr. Chopra requested that donations be made to the Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health, a non-profit founded by Dr. Chopra to carry on his advocacy and education work around food safety, and sustainable agriculture.

Donations to CCFSH can be made as follows:

by e-Transfer sent to media@foodsovereigntycanada.com;

by cheque made out to: Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health, address 464-A Sunnyside Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1S 0S9;

by credit card

 

“Increasingly Urgent:” Bill Gates Ups the Ante, Donates Millions to Push GMOs on Small Farmers Around the World

Despite these and other contradictory reports, both Monsanto and Gates continue to insist that GMO “technology” is needed to “feed the world,” especially places like Africa where Gates is heavily involved.

And now, Gates is putting his money where his mouth is yet again, donating millions to a new campaign that will likely be used promote GMOs (and accompanying synthetic chemicals) on a massive scale that hasn’t been seen in years.

“Increasingly Urgent:” Bill Gates Ups the Ante, Donates Millions to Push GMOs on Small Farmers Around the World

 

NEW DOCS Prove Monsanto Corruption & Cancer Risks (9 min)

Lee opens by revealing the government sanctioned poison pusher, Monsanto’s backdoor deals. Cancer causing pesticides like Roundup were widely used, despite science to prove otherwise, but the company made a concerted effort to get scientists, the media, and the government, on their side by filling their pockets or intimidating them. Monsanto also has unholy partnerships with universities which taints scientific research even further. But they did such a good job of hiding this that only few media organizations could actually see through the fine print. This and more on Redacted Tonight.