How Going Organic Benefits Your Body

Health Ambition

The word organic is perhaps the word of the decade in regards to the evolving world of food. What does it mean? Why is it important? Why is it more expensive than non-organic food?

“Organic” is the word used to describe plants that have been grown free of pesticides, herbicides, chemicals and genetic manipulation. As big-box companies have been increasingly greedy, these practices has become less popular with mainstream brands and food corporations because they require more diligent care and money by farmers.

These large corporations and brands pay farmers to grow in soil that has been prepped with powerful weed killers, and plants that have been coated with insect/bug resistant toxic agents. All of these things are done in an effort to maximize the size of their harvest.

What they neglect to make a priority is what these practices mean for the health of those that consume them. These greed monsters have put health on the back burner and have focused their attention on profit margins. They spending as little as possible to grow and produce these fruits and vegetables and then charging the masses for their contaminated plants.

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Glyphosate Residues Discovered in Almond Milk, Bread and Veggie Burgers

New laboratory testing commissioned by Moms Across America has shown the presence of the world’s most used herbicide – glyphosate – in almond milk, vegetarian burgers, bread and Skippy’s “100% Natural” peanut butter and Lipton’s “100% Natural” Mint and Green tea.

The new batch testing results showed that conventional almond milk contained glyphosate at a level of 0.87 ppb and certified organic almond milk contained 0.07 ppb. The batch bread testing showed a range of glyphosate residues from 6.47 ppb to 140 ppb. Conventional veggie burgers batch testing revealed 52.20 ppb of glyphosate. Certified organic veggie burgers contained 3.27 ppb.

“100% Natural” Skippy peanut butter was found to contain 11.71 ppb of glyphosate residue and “100% Natural” Lipton Tea was found to contain 108.90 ppb and Lipton’s “100% Natural” Green Tea contained 208.29 ppb.

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The Best Non Toxic Cookware For Your Kitchen (4 min)

Why is Non Stick Cookware So Bad? These days much of the cookware being produced has non stick coatings which have some obvious benefits, but unfortunately also have some pretty serious side effects. Teflon is a perfect example. There are videos on YouTube showing a bird in a cage high over a cooktop where a teflon pan was being used for cooking food. The toxic fumes coming off actually killed the bird. Poor bird, but it’s a perfect example of what I’m talking about. If fumes coming off from cooking ‘one time’ has the ability to kill a small animal then you definitely don’t want to be using that in your kitchen regularly.

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Republicans Back Monsanto, Threaten to Cut WHO’s Funding Which Calls Glysophate ‘Carcinogenic’

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

Some Republican lawmakers have bashed the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, a World Health Organization, WHO, agency and threatened to cut its funding over for calling a widely used herbicide chemical, glyphosate as a possible “carcinogenic” at a House Science Committee hearing.

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

On Tuesday, a Republican representative from Texas, Lamar Smith, said the health regulating agency’s claims were “unsubstantiated” and “not backed by reliable data.”

“The selective use of data and the lack of public disclosure raise questions about why IARC should receive any government funding in the future,” Smith said.

WHO is defending its stance based on years-long research.

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A coloring book! About growing food!

A coloring book! About growing food!

These past few months, I have been writing and illustrating a series of little coloring books about food and edible gardening. They’re pretty neat, if I do say so myself.

There are a limited number of print copies available, or you can buy a digital copy to download and print at home.

If you would like, you can buy them here: shop.plantandplate.com