A Growing Problem in Our Glyphosate Saturated Food System – Solutions: How to stop the Cause of IBS, Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis (42 min)

Dr. John Bergman – Nov 6, 2014 – (42 min)

How to stop the Cause of IBS, Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis The antibiotics, genetically modified foods and toxins we take in to our bodies are the cause of many systemic conditions. The current medical model is hedonistic in nature. This means that it is meant to “just make people feel good” by relieving symptoms instead of focusing on the actual CAUSE of the symptoms. There is no money in prevention, only in masking symptoms.

At http://bergmanchiropractic.com and http://Owners-Guide.com we strive to educate people on natural solutions to health.

VIDEO LINK (42 MIN)

Pesticide Ruling Is Latest Embarrassing Setback for Trump

Truthout.org – Aug 11, 2018

A federal appeals court in California ruled on Thursday that the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision to ditch a proposed ban on a pesticide linked to brain damage in unborn babies and young children violated federal law.

The ruling generated embarrassing headlines for the Trump administration as it rolled out a number of attention-grabbing proposals that are also expected to face serious legal and legislative hurdles.

Scott Pruitt, President Trump’s disgraced former EPA chief, signed an order shortly after taking office in March 2017 that reversed steps by the Obama administration to ban the decades-old pesticide chlorpyrifos on farms. The insect-killing chemical was banned for household use in 2000, and advocates have petitioned to remove it from the food supply for more than a decade amid mounting evidence that chlorpyrifos can harm developing brains.

In a ruling that scolded the agency for ignoring its congressional mandate to protect the public from dangerous chemicals, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the EPA on Friday to finalize a ban on chlorpyrifos within 60 days. The court said there was “no justification” for Pruitt’s decision to reverse course on banning the pesticide because the EPA had scientific evidence showing that chlorpyrifos residue on food causes neurodevelopmental damage to children.

SOURCE

Monsanto ordered to pay $289m as jury rules weedkiller caused man’s cancer

Aug 11, 2018 – The Guardian

Monsanto suffered a major blow with a jury ruling that the company was liable for a terminally ill man’s cancer, awarding him $289m in damages.

Dewayne Johnson, a 46-year-old former groundskeeper, won a huge victory in the landmark case on Friday, with the jury determining that Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller caused his cancer and that the corporation failed to warn him of the health hazards from exposure. The jury further found that Monsanto “acted with malice or oppression”.

Johnson’s lawyers argued over the course of a month-long trial in San Francisco that Monsanto had “fought science” for years and targeted academics who spoke up about possible health risks of the herbicide product. Johnson was the first person to take the agrochemical corporation to trial over allegations that the chemical sold under the brand Roundup causes cancer.

In the extraordinary verdict, which Monsanto said it intends to appeal, the jury ruled that the company was responsible for “negligent failure” and knew or should have known that its product was “dangerous”.

“We were finally able to show the jury the secret, internal Monsanto documents proving that Monsanto has known for decades that … Roundup could cause cancer,” Johnson’s lawyer Brent Wisner said in a statement. The verdict, he added, sent a “message to Monsanto that its years of deception regarding Roundup is over and that they should put consumer safety first over profits”.

SOURCE

Where does your fruit come from and at what cost? (26 min)

DW Documentary – Mar. 17, 2018

Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer and Germany’s main supplier of the fruit. Cheap labor and pesticides mean low prices in Western Europe. While organic pineapples are now being farmed on a larger scale to increasing demand, this likewise has negative consequences for Costa Rica’s ecosystem. Tropical fruits such as pineapples, bananas and kiwis have been available in West European supermarkets for years. But the innocent appearance of these popular products is deceptive. The fruits are cheap because costs are cut in the production countries – affecting wages and health factors. Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer, and is known both for its exemplary ecological approach and for sustainable tourism. It is in this very country, however, where workers on plantations complain about a lack of rights. Pineapples are grown and harvested here in vast monoculture plantations using huge amounts of pesticides. According to studies conducted by Costa Rica’s national university, the country is not just a major tropical fruit exporter but also the world’s biggest per-hectare user of pesticides. Plantation workers have as a result been reporting rashes and headaches. At the heart of pineapple farming, to the northeast of the capital of San José, trucks regularly have to supply villages with clean drinking water because the groundwater has been contaminated with bromacil – a weed killer banned in the EU. In the north of the country huge pineapple plantations are threatening the livelihoods of traditional small farmers, while conventional banana plantations continue to grow across the southwest. Many supermarkets in Europe have recognized that they can make money with sustainability. Almost all the major chains have signed up to ecological quality seals that stand for responsible growing methods with low pesticide use. The example of Costa Rica, however, shows that such promises aren’t always strictly kept. Although there are farmers who have set up their own businesses with the new growing methods, and although the organic sector in Costa Rica is constantly growing, even organic bananas and pineapples require large areas of land for farming. The result is monocultures with consequences for the ecosystem.

SOURCE

Kristin Lawless on the Corporate Takeover of the American Kitchen

Corporate Crime Reporter – By Editor Filed in News July 18, 2018
That’s the story that Kristin Lawless tells in her new book – Formerly Known As Food: How the Industrial Food System is Changing Our Minds, Bodies and Culture.

Lawless challenges the modern food movement for focusing on individual choice – made famous by Michael Pollan’s prescription – eat food, not too much, mostly plants.

Lawless might revise it to – challenge, as much as possible, corporate power and the corporate takeover of the kitchen.

Flip to the back of the book to see how Lawless differs from Pollan and the food movement’s focus on the individual.

Instead, she targets corporate power.

Stop predatory marketing of poor quality industrial foods. Stop the marketing of infant formula to parents. Place warning labels on all industrial food packaging – “these foods may be harmful to your health.” Stop the use of thousands of chemicals in and on our food supply.

Create a federal urban farm program. Demand nutrition and cooking education in all public schools. Demand a universal basic income. Demand payment for cooking and other household work. Demand six months paid parental leave – insuring the option to breast feed as a right.

Lawless writes that ten companies control nearly every large food and beverage brand in the world – Nestle, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, Unilever, Danone, General Mills, Kellogg’s, Mars, Associated British Foods and Mondelez.

And still the food movement focus is the individual, not the corporation.

“When food movement leaders say the solutions are to eat whole foods and buy organic, they leave out the crucial fact that we need to collectively reject the production of poor quality processed foods and stop the production of dangerous pesticides and other environmental chemicals that contaminate many foods,” she writes. “Critics do not often articulate this omission, but it is largely why the movement is perceived as elitist – and rightly so. If the food movement’s solutions are market based and predicated on spending more for safer and healthier food, they ignore how impossible these solutions are for most Americans. In fact, this agenda serves the agendas of Big Food and Big Ag quite well.”

SOURCE