USA Approves Bayer-Monsanto Mega-Merger Canada could be next

April 10, 2018. On Monday April 9, the Wall Street Journal reported that the United States Department of Justice has agreed to allow a merger between seed and pesticide companies Bayer and Monsanto, creating the largest seed and pesticide company in the world. A US approval means that Canada could also soon permit the merger.

The US Department of Justice has not yet officially announced the deal, along with any conditions for the approval. Europe allowed the merger on the condition that Bayer sell some of its seeds, pesticides and digital farming investments to remove overlaps with Monsanto.

A decision from Canada’s Competition Bureau is also required but no timeline has been provided. The proposed merger requires regulatory approval from anti-trust agencies across the world.

“A US decision brings a Canadian announcement closer,” said Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN). “Canada is on the verge of making a decision that will affect farmers and consumers for many decades. It will shape the future of food and farming in Canada and across the world.”

The new merged company could control around 30 percent of the world’s commercial seed market and 25 percent of agricultural pesticides.

“A merger of this size creates an unprecedented level of corporate control over seeds and pesticides,” said Sharratt.

CBAN is calling on The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to stop the merger.

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19 Vegetable Garden Care & Maintenance Tips for a Successful Harvest

Does gardening sound like too much work to you? I’m going to shoot straight with you; it can be overwhelming at times.

However, it is work with a hefty reward. You get tons of fresh vegetables and fruit. You also know where they came from and what went into them, giving you peace of mind that you are not ingesting harmful chemicals.

Also, gardening is a great way to get outside, enjoy the fresh air, and get a natural Vitamin D boost as well.

If this sounds great to you, you’ll need to understand that a garden needs care. I’m going to share with you the necessary steps you’ll need to follow to give your garden the proper care.

That way, you can enjoy an excellent harvest and keep your garden under control to avoid feeling overwhelmed. Here is what you need to do:

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How Famine Under the Nazis Revealed the Cause of Celiac Disease

In the winter of 1944, the city of the Hague was going hungry. In fact, all the cities of the western Netherlands were hungry. Railway workers and the country’s government in exile had defied German occupiers with a strike. In response, the Nazis significantly cut off the country’s most populated region from food supplies. The canals also froze, making transportation and escape impossible. What resulted was the “hunger winter,” a famine of unprecedented scale.

Solutions were few. Fuel ran out quickly, and some residents even ground up tulips to make flour. One group, however, wasn’t suffering as much as expected. In the Hague’s Juliana Children’s Hospital, pediatrician Willem Karel Dicke noticed that the children in his care with celiac disease were improving, even as they starved.

Doctors had known about celiac for years. But there was no consensus on its cause, or how to treat it. It acquired its name in 100 A.D., when Greek* physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia was stumped by an ailment with symptoms of weakness, malnutrition, and diarrhea, which he dubbed koiliakos.

Today, celiac disease is known to be a genetic autoimmune disorder. Those afflicted have a severe reaction to gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat. It can be a challenge to diagnose, but once identified, the treatment is simple: eating a diet free of gluten.

But at the dawn of modern medicine, celiac remained a frustrating mystery to doctors. Even worse, the disease had the greatest effect on children.

Food was airdropped in April, ending the hunger winter. Fotograaf Onbekend/Nationaal Archief/Anefo/CC0

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Government reaping royalties from GM Atlantic salmon

Common Ground – March 30, 2018

The Canadian government is receiving 10% royalties from sales of the world’s first genetically modified (GM or genetically engineered) animal, a GM Atlantic salmon.

“We’re concerned that the government is responsible for regulating this GM fish and also has a stake in its success,” said Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN).

The royalties are part of a 2009 $2.8 million-dollar grant agreement between the company AquaBounty and the federal government Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. The royalties will be paid to the Government of Canada until the grant amount is paid back. If the GM salmon is not a commercial success, there is no requirement for the company to repay the government funds.

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Video: Dr. SENEFF Lecture and Expert Panel Discussion on the effects of Glyphosate in our Food – March 27th, 2018

Dr. Stephanie Seneff Lecture on glyphosate, sulfate deficiency & degenerative diseases. Followed by an Expert Panel Discussion, Q&A: Sachin Patel, Jodi Koberinski and Brett Hawes. Hosted by Melody Byblow,
Presented March 27th, 2018 in Toronto, Canada  holisticwellnessadvantage.ca

Video Production sponsored by the Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health – CCFSH.org

1 hour lecture with slides and 50 min of panel discussion and Q & A

Video link: Dr. Stephanie Seneff Lecture and Expert Panel Discussion, Q&A

Slide show link: http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/2018/Toronto.pptx

Documentary: Modified (2017) – (87 min) Why are GMO foods not labeled in North America?

‘Modified’ is a first-person feature documentary that questions why genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not labeled on food products in the United States and Canada, despite being labeled in 64 countries around the world. Shot over a span of ten years, the film follows the ongoing struggle to label GMOs, exposing the cozy relationship between the biotech industry and governments. The film is anchored in the intimate story of the filmmaker’s relationship to her mom, a prolific gardener, seed saver, and food activist who battled cancer while the film production was underway. Interweaving the personal and the political, the film uses family archives, animations, and mouth-watering vignettes from the filmmaker’s award-winning PBS cooking show to create a moving account of family legacy, grassroots activism, and the journey for a more sustainable and transparent food system.

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