Category Archives: Organic Farming

How Going Organic Benefits Your Body

Health Ambition

The word organic is perhaps the word of the decade in regards to the evolving world of food. What does it mean? Why is it important? Why is it more expensive than non-organic food?

“Organic” is the word used to describe plants that have been grown free of pesticides, herbicides, chemicals and genetic manipulation. As big-box companies have been increasingly greedy, these practices has become less popular with mainstream brands and food corporations because they require more diligent care and money by farmers.

These large corporations and brands pay farmers to grow in soil that has been prepped with powerful weed killers, and plants that have been coated with insect/bug resistant toxic agents. All of these things are done in an effort to maximize the size of their harvest.

What they neglect to make a priority is what these practices mean for the health of those that consume them. These greed monsters have put health on the back burner and have focused their attention on profit margins. They spending as little as possible to grow and produce these fruits and vegetables and then charging the masses for their contaminated plants.

Source

A coloring book! About growing food!

A coloring book! About growing food!

These past few months, I have been writing and illustrating a series of little coloring books about food and edible gardening. They’re pretty neat, if I do say so myself.

There are a limited number of print copies available, or you can buy a digital copy to download and print at home.

If you would like, you can buy them here: shop.plantandplate.com

Seeds of Life: A Quiet Revolution is Underway at the Foothills of Niyamgiri, India (14 min)

With help of local organisations, the Panga Kodhs have gone back to traditional, organic, mixed cropping methods. Even the forests are benefiting.

“I’m born of this soil. Putting poison in the soil is like poisoning one’s parents. Why would I harm myself like this?”, says Adi Kumurka. Kumurka belongs to the Panga Kondh indigenous community in Odisha’s Rayagada district. His community is engaged in mixed organic cropping from traditional seeds. This is the traditional way of farming that his community has practised since untold times. But there was a long gap in between when malnourishment and farmer suicides compelled these traditional farmers to migrate to faraway places to look for jobs. What changed?

Article: Seeds of Life: A Quiet Revolution

Video: Seeds of Life (14 min)