Category Archives: Food System

France Forces Supermarkets to Donate Food Rather than Dump It, So Should U.S.

France recently made it illegal for grocery stores to dump or destroy good food. Instead of letting 1 in 8 Americans go hungry, maybe we should do this too.

An estimated 40 percent of the food produced in the United States is wasted every year, around 150,000 tons.

Around 10 percent of that is thrown out by grocery stores just before it reaches its expiration or “best before” date.

Meanwhile, 1 in 8 Americans struggles with hunger.

France has put an end to the waste, by making it illegal for grocery stores to throw out or destroy unsold food, and now the European Union may consider a similar continent-wide law, as the European Parliament just set a goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030.

Charities in France are now able to give out millions more free meals each year to people struggling to afford to eat.

SOURCE

Revealing Food’s Hidden Costs: New Framework for Food and Agriculture

Food Tank – June 4, 2018

“We are trying to pull together the latest scientific results on food systems,” says Müller. “We tried to link together the latest findings of economists, environmentalists, agriculturalists, people looking at labor and trade, and science to fight poverty. If you bring these results together in a new way, you can see that the system is more than all the different parts of the disciplinary sciences working on it.”

To ensure the sustainability of agriculture and food systems, an important step is to account for externalities through market mechanisms. By creating a more comprehensive evaluation framework, decisionmakers can better compare different policies, programs, and strategies, while the market can more accurately value food. TEEBAgriFood hopes their new framework will help achieve their vision of a world where informed decisionmaking upholds public good and ensures nutrition and health for all humans so they can live in harmony with nature.

“Our framework provides a holistic, ethical, wide-angle lens with which to really understand our food systems today,” says Pavan Sukhdev, member of the TEEBAgriFood Steering Committee and Founder-CEO of GIST Advisory. “Because of its holistic approach, this framework is not as easy to apply as a single-lens approach—‘per hectare productivity,’ for example—but it is ethically, socially, economically, and environmentally much more appropriate, and can provide sustainable business models in the context of climate change, changing global demographics, local economies, and health. I want decisionmakers in governments and businesses to realize that they should support the use of this wide-angle lens applied to the full eco-agri-food system instead of the inadequate narrow lens of per-hectare productivity in farms.”

SOURCE

Organic Agriculture Is Going Mainstream, But Not the Way You Think It Is

Organic going mainstream

“Big Organics” is often derided by advocates of sustainable agriculture. The American food authors Michael Pollan and Julie Guthman, for example, argue that as organic agriculture has scaled up and gone mainstream it has lost its commitment to building an alternative system for providing food, instead “replicating what it set out to oppose.”

New research, however, suggests that the relationship between organic and conventional farming is more complex. The flow of influence is starting to reverse course.

Even with the upscaling, the market position of organic agriculture remains limited.

In Canada, organic sales grow by nearly 10 percent per year, and the total value of the organic market is around $5.4 billion. Yet the reality is that the industry is still dwarfed by conventional agriculture.

There are more than 4,000 certified organic farms in Canada, totalling 2.43 million acres. But this accounts for only 1.5 percent of the country’s total agricultural land.

Also, aside from the two organic heavyweights—coffee (imported) and mixed greens (mostly imported)—the market share of organic groceries is pretty small, at around three percent.

Yet the influence of organics is felt well beyond its own limited market.

SOURCE

Video: Dr. SENEFF Lecture and Expert Panel Discussion on the effects of Glyphosate in our Food – March 27th, 2018

Dr. Stephanie Seneff Lecture on glyphosate, sulfate deficiency & degenerative diseases. Followed by an Expert Panel Discussion, Q&A: Sachin Patel, Jodi Koberinski and Brett Hawes. Hosted by Melody Byblow,
Presented March 27th, 2018 in Toronto, Canada  holisticwellnessadvantage.ca

Video Production sponsored by the Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health – CCFSH.org

1 hour lecture with slides and 50 min of panel discussion and Q & A

Video link: Dr. Stephanie Seneff Lecture and Expert Panel Discussion, Q&A

Slide show link: http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/2018/Toronto.pptx

Dr. Mercola Interviews Maryn McKenna About the Dangers of Antibiotics in the Chicken Industry (4 min)

Published on Feb 5, 2018
Image result for Dr. Mercola Interviews Maryn McKenna About the Dangers of Antibiotics in the Chicken Industry
Natural health expert and Mercola.com founder Dr. Joseph Mercola interviews investigative journalist Maryn McKenna on how the chicken industry gave birth to antibiotic resistance – and how it is becoming a dangerous health threat today.

Radical Food Resistance – A call to arms against Big Food.

BY Wayne Roberts
| 43.2 Food and Resilience

This good food conversation needs to be sprinkled with words that name the dominant food system characteristic – control by dominant corporations. “Struggling against” needs to become as much part of the food ethos as “collaborating toward.”

What would this mean practically?

We would laugh out loud at the mention of, and criticize Ontario’s Local Food Act, which has not provided a dime for public purchasing of local and sustainable food, nor a penny for urban agriculture, or new and young farmers.

We would denounce the governing Trudeau Liberals for giving the kiss of death to a national food policy by handing the file to the department of agriculture, which has no officials or staff who are knowledgeable about food security or public health and which is controlled by agribusiness interests. We would also denounce the Ministry of Finance project, led by private consultant Dominic Barton of McKinsey and Company, to make factory farms and food exports the engine of Canada’s emerging economy – as well as the nearly billion dollars in so-called super-cluster grants to big corporations.

Source: Alternative Journal article